Creating Biomedical Technologies to Improve Health

LABS AT NIBIB

Section on Biophotonics

Fluorescent proteins come in multiple colors and have similar structures consisting of 11-strand beta-barrels with the chromophore located inside the barrel.  This is an image of a chromophore which is a cyclized tripeptide which forms in the absence of any exogeneous factors with the exception of molecular oxygen. This property makes fluorescent proteins invaluable for the tagging of specific proteins of interest and their study inside living cells.
Fluorescent proteins come in multiple colors and have similar structures consisting of 11-strand beta-barrels with the chromophore located inside the barrel. The chromophore is a cyclized tripeptide which forms in the absence of any exogeneous factors with the exception of molecular oxygen. This property makes fluorescent proteins invaluable for the tagging of specific proteins of interest and their study inside living cells. This image was made using Cn3D and pdb file 1EMA.

The NIBIB Section on Biophotonics develops probes and techniques for use in diffraction limited and sub-diffraction limited fluorescence imaging of cells and tissues. Major emphasis is placed on developing new and improving existing genetically encoded fluorescent proteins for use as markers and sensors. Methods and technologies include confocal, TIRF, and widefield microscopies, single molecule imaging, fluorescence spectroscopy, and protein engineering.