Explore more about: Women's Health

June 2, 2020
News
The National Institutes of Health has launched a $1 million Technology Accelerator Challenge (TAC) to spur the design and development of non-invasive, handheld, digital technologies to detect, diagnose, and guide therapies for diseases with high global and public health impact.
October 22, 2019
News
Learn about Dr. Charolotte Gaydos's scientific accomplishments throughout her career journey and her advice for women scientists.
October 22, 2019
News
Learn about Dr. Carla Pugh's scientific accomplishments throughout her career journey and her advice for women scientists.
November 25, 2019
News
Women undergoing treatment for ovarian cancer are checked for tumor cells that may have spread to surrounding tissues, but current technologies miss very small metastatic areas. Now a laser microscopy technique is able to identify these regions with great accuracy.
December 9, 2020
News
Researchers have developed a new 3D printed device that will make it faster and easier to identify women at risk for premature birth.
December 3, 2020
News
Biomedical engineers have developed a smartphone app for anemia screening that can assess blood hemoglobin levels through the window of the user’s fingernail.
August 16, 2019
News
Experts say patients can get results before they leave the doctor’s office, allowing them to start treatments earlier
December 9, 2020
News
Up to 50% of women skip potentially life-saving mammograms often because the procedure can cause extreme discomfort and pain. Now researchers have developed a painless, light-based, non-radioactive, 15-second procedure that could revolutionize breast cancer screening and save lives.
December 3, 2020
News

A new approach to evaluating the risk of preterm birth has been proposed by analyzing the properties of cervical mucus. The researchers found that cervical mucus from women who delivered their babies early, before 37 weeks, was very different from that of women who delivered later. Read more at MIT News.

October 3, 2019
News
NIBIB-funded researchers at the University of Washington have pioneered an approach to image functional activity in the brains of individual fetuses, allowing a better look at how functional networks within the brain develop.