Creating Biomedical Technologies to Improve Health

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Grantee News • July 17, 2013

NIBIB grantee Lori Setton, of Duke University, has developed a biomaterial designed to deliver a booster shot of reparative cells to the cushions found between spinal discs. The biomaterial consists of an injectable gel that solidifies between the discs, trapping cells in place. Read the full article at Pratt.Duke.edu

Grantee News • July 3, 2013

NIBIB grantee Jeffrey Weiss, of the University of Utah, and other NIH-funded scientists talk about biomechanics – the study of how the body moves – and how they way we move relates to overall health.  Read the full article on NIH: News in Health.

Grantee News • June 24, 2013

The Academy of Radiology Research announced that 43 researchers, including many NIBIB grantees, have been selected as recipients of the 2013 Distinguished Investigator Award. This prestigious honor recognizes individuals for their accomplishments in the field of medical imaging. Read the full article on acadrad.org.

Grantee News • June 18, 2013

Former NIBIB grantee Anthony Atala, of Wake Forest University, and colleagues discuss the opportunities and challenges of growing custom organs in a lab, using a patient’s own cells. Such research can provide more options to patients who need organ transplants. Read the full article on USAToday.com

Science Highlights • June 11, 2013
A “test run” of radiation therapy in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma can show how much radiation is likely to be absorbed by a tumor during actual treatment. This information may help doctors to estimate the dose needed for effective treatment more precisely than currently used measures, such as a person’s height and weight.
Grantee News • June 5, 2013

NIBIB grantees Jason Burdick and Robert Mauck at the University of Pennsylvania have found a way to coax stem cells to differentiate into cartilage-producing cells by encapsulating them in gels that contain cadherin molecules. The technique could be used to increase the efficiency of stem cell transplants used to repair injured or deteriorating cartilage. Read the full article on upenn.edu

NIBIB in the News • June 5, 2013

NIBIB grantees Jason Burdick and Robert Mauck at the University of Pennsylvania have found a way to coax stem cells to differentiate into cartilage-producing cells by encapsulating them in gels that contain cadherin molecules. The technique could be used to increase the efficiency of stem cell transplants used to repair injured or deteriorating cartilage. Read the full article on ScienceDaily.com

Grantee News • June 5, 2013

NIBIB grantee Bin He, of the University of Minnesota, and team demonstrate their noninvasive brain-computer interface that allows precise, thought-guided movements of a toy helicopter. Such interfaces may someday lead to mind-controlled assistive devices for people who have been paralyzed. Read the full article on usnews.com

Science Highlights • June 3, 2013

Imagine being able to redirect powerful immune cells to fight cancer. How about reprogramming a diabetic’s skin cell into a cell that could manufacture the insulin their pancreas no longer produces? Could we dial down the production of fat cells in obese adolescents? These are major health problems and medical challenges that may be more achievable with a new fundamental technology that gets vital control molecules into cells faster, safer, and more effectively.

Grantee News • May 15, 2013

Previous NIBIB DEBUT contest winners continue to develop their award-winning low-cost, pocket-sized spirometer with a goal of revolutionizing the way asthma and other chronic respiratory diseases are diagnosed and treated. Read full article on wustl.edu

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