Creating Biomedical Technologies to Improve Health

NEWS & EVENTS

Newsroom

Press Releases • August 12, 2013
Three teams were announced as winners in the Design by Biomedical Undergraduate Teams (DEBUT) challenge, a biomedical engineering design competition for teams of undergraduate students. The three categories addressed the critical needs in biomedical technology, focusing on devices for diagnostics, therapeutics, and technology that can aid underserved populations and individuals with disabilities. The challenge was managed by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), which is a part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIBIB in the News • August 12, 2013

A lightweight, portable ultrasound patch may help speed up the healing time for people with venous ulcers, a recent study suggests. The pocket-sized technology, which weighs less than a pound, could potentially help reduce the $1 billion spent each year on treating these types of ulcers. Read the full story on ZipTrials.us

NIBIB in the News • August 12, 2013

Researchers out of Drexel University (Philadelphia) have developed a new method for treating chronic wounds, in the form of an ultrasound applicator that can be worn like a band-aid. The device was effective in a small clinical study of 20 in the treatment of venous ulcers. Read the full story on MedicalDeviceDaily.com

NIBIB in the News • August 7, 2013

Scientists at Drexel University are using a band-aid-like patch that emits low-frequency ultrasound to heal chronic wounds. Read the full story on Gizmag.com

NIBIB in the News • August 4, 2013

A new invention about the size of a large Band-Aid delivers low-frequency ultrasound waves to skin wounds to hyper-charge the healing process. A small clinical trial at Drexel University in Pennsylvania examined 20 patients with chronic leg ulcers, assigning them to five-person groups. Read the full story on Healthline.com

NIBIB in the News • August 2, 2013

Researchers at Drexel University, Philadelphia, used an ultrasound patch to dramatically reduce the size of leg ulcers in just four weeks. The patch, which weighs just three ounces, is battery-operated and sends low frequency ultrasound directly to the wound. It is thought that the ultrasound stimulates the production of connective tissue and the immune cells that play a critical role in healing. Read the full story at Telegraph.co.uk

Press Releases • August 1, 2013
In a small clinical study, researchers administered a new method for treating chronic wounds using a novel ultrasound applicator that can be worn like a band-aid. The applicator delivers low-frequency, low-intensity ultrasound directly to wounds, and was found to significantly accelerate healing in five patients with venous ulcers.
NIBIB in the News • August 1, 2013

In a small clinical study, researchers administered a new method for treating chronic wounds using a novel ultrasound applicator that can be worn like a band-aid. The applicator delivers low-frequency, low-intensity ultrasound directly to wounds, and was found to significantly accelerate healing in five patients with venous ulcers. Read the full article on ScienceDaily.com

Grantee News • July 30, 2013

Mark Brezinski is a major believer in the benefits of optimizing one’s environment when it comes to learning and using a “reverse education approach” to train people in his lab and teach his undergraduate, graduate and junior faculty students. Read the full article at BWH Clinical & Research News.

Grantee News • July 26, 2013

NIBIB and other NIH-funded scientists have teamed up to develop an adhesive that mimics the grip of a parasitic worm.  Composed of a sheet of microneedles whose tips swell upon contact with water, the device could be used to adhere skin grafts to wounds, deliver drugs to target tissues, and numerous other applications. Read the full article at the-scientist.com

Pages