Creating Biomedical Technologies to Improve Health

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NIBIB in the News • August 7, 2013

Scientists at Drexel University are using a band-aid-like patch that emits low-frequency ultrasound to heal chronic wounds. Read the full story on Gizmag.com

NIBIB in the News • August 4, 2013

A new invention about the size of a large Band-Aid delivers low-frequency ultrasound waves to skin wounds to hyper-charge the healing process. A small clinical trial at Drexel University in Pennsylvania examined 20 patients with chronic leg ulcers, assigning them to five-person groups. Read the full story on Healthline.com

NIBIB in the News • August 2, 2013

Researchers at Drexel University, Philadelphia, used an ultrasound patch to dramatically reduce the size of leg ulcers in just four weeks. The patch, which weighs just three ounces, is battery-operated and sends low frequency ultrasound directly to the wound. It is thought that the ultrasound stimulates the production of connective tissue and the immune cells that play a critical role in healing. Read the full story at Telegraph.co.uk

Press Releases • August 1, 2013
In a small clinical study, researchers administered a new method for treating chronic wounds using a novel ultrasound applicator that can be worn like a band-aid. The applicator delivers low-frequency, low-intensity ultrasound directly to wounds, and was found to significantly accelerate healing in five patients with venous ulcers.
NIBIB in the News • August 1, 2013

In a small clinical study, researchers administered a new method for treating chronic wounds using a novel ultrasound applicator that can be worn like a band-aid. The applicator delivers low-frequency, low-intensity ultrasound directly to wounds, and was found to significantly accelerate healing in five patients with venous ulcers. Read the full article on ScienceDaily.com

Grantee News • July 30, 2013

Mark Brezinski is a major believer in the benefits of optimizing one’s environment when it comes to learning and using a “reverse education approach” to train people in his lab and teach his undergraduate, graduate and junior faculty students. Read the full article at BWH Clinical & Research News.

Grantee News • July 26, 2013

NIBIB and other NIH-funded scientists have teamed up to develop an adhesive that mimics the grip of a parasitic worm.  Composed of a sheet of microneedles whose tips swell upon contact with water, the device could be used to adhere skin grafts to wounds, deliver drugs to target tissues, and numerous other applications. Read the full article at the-scientist.com

Press Releases • July 25, 2013
Silk has walked straight off the runway and into the lab. According to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, silk implants placed in the brain of laboratory animals and designed to release a specific chemical, adenosine, may help stop the progression of epilepsy. The research was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), which are part of the National Institutes of Health.
Press Releases • July 22, 2013
The National Institutes of Health will fund up to $24 million per year for four years to establish six to eight investigator-initiated Big Data to Knowledge Centers of Excellence. The centers will improve the ability of the research community to use increasingly large and complex datasets through the development and distribution of innovative approaches, methods, software, and tools for data sharing, integration, analysis and management.
Grantee News • July 19, 2013

NIBIB-funded researchers at Cornell University’s Weill Medical College have developed an RNA-based biosensor technology that allows rapid creation of sensors for tracking molecules and metabolites in living cells. Applications include studies of metabolic profiles of disease and monitoring metabolic changes in response to treatments. Read the full article on biotechniques.com

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