Creating Biomedical Technologies to Improve Health

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Grantee News • November 2, 2013

Triple-Negative breast cancer is difficult to treat because its cells are armed with molecular pumps that remove anti-cancer drugs. Former NIBIB grantee Paula Hammond, a chemical engineer at MIT, is using triple-layered chemical bombs a few billionths of a metre across to first sabotage the pumps and then deliver a poisonous payload when the cells are thus unprotected. Read the full story at Economist.com

NIBIB in the News • October 29, 2013

Slate online magazine features new microscopes created at NIH that can reveal live, developing cells in unprecedent 3-D clarity. Watch the video at Slate.com

NIBIB in the News • October 28, 2013

Three projects have been awarded funding by the National Institutes of Health to develop innovative robots that work cooperatively with people and adapt to changing environments to improve human capabilities and enhance medical procedures. Read more at Kurzweilai.net.

Grantee News • October 25, 2013

Vanderbilt University's Michael Goldfarb, Ph.D., was recognized by Popular Mechanics in their 2013 list of “Ten Innovators Who Changed The World” for his work on the Indego robotic exoskeleton to help paraplegics stand and walk. Read the full press release at vanderbilt.edu.

NIBIB in the News • October 25, 2013

The bots being developed by the National Robotics Initiative aren't the droids you're looking for—they're better. A look at the surprising co-robots supported by the federal initiative's second round of funding. Read more at PopularScience.com.

Science Highlights • October 24, 2013
Biology moves into the third dimension, may help observe how a brain develops and viruses attack: Researchers at NIH have developed two new microscopes, both the first of their kind. The first captures small, fast moving organisms at an unprecedented rate and the second displays large cell samples in three dimensions while decreasing the amount of harmful light exposure to the cells. Both microscopes surpass in clarity any other currently on the market.
Press Releases • October 23, 2013
Three projects have been awarded funding by the National Institutes of Health to develop innovative robots that work cooperatively with people and adapt to changing environments to improve human capabilities and enhance medical procedures. Funding for these projects totals approximately $2.4 million over the next five years, subject to the availability of funds.
Science Highlights • October 23, 2013
The research team at Brown University responsible for developing BrainGate—an advanced brain-computer interface that allowed an almost completely paralyzed woman to serve herself a drink of coffee for the first time in 15 years—was awarded Israel’s first ever Moshe Mirilashvili Memorial Fund B.R.A.I.N. Prize in Tel Aviv on October 15, 2013.
NIBIB in the News • October 18, 2013

Researchers from NIBIB's intramural program have developed two new microscopes, both the first of their kind. The first captures small, fast moving organisms at an unprecedented rate and the second displays thick cell samples in three dimensions while decreasing the amount of harmful light exposure to the cells—both surpassing in clarity any other microscopes currently on the market.

NIBIB in the News • October 4, 2013

NIH-funded scientists at Johns Hopkins University have recently simplified the method for creating microvascular networks, which are important for feeding living tissue with nutrients and carrying off wastes. The team successfully transplanted these lab-grown microscopic blood vessles into animals. The development could bring these life-supporting vessels a step closer to clinical use, for treating wounds, perhaps, or diabetes, stroke and heart disease.

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