Explore more about: Bionic Systems

August 3, 2020
News
A new technique funded by NIBIB and developed by University of Minnesota researchers allows 3D printing of hydrogel-based sensors directly on the surface of organs, such as lungs—even as they expand and contract. The technology was developed to support robot-assisted medical treatments.
May 19, 2020
News
A team at ClearCam, Inc., with funding from the NIBIB and ties to the University of Texas at Austin, designed a device for wiping a laparoscope lens clean, much the same way that a wiper blade clears a fogged up window.
April 14, 2020
News
Bioengineers have created a blood-drawing robot that performed as well or better than technicians. The device could increase blood draw success from difficult- to-find veins and allow healthcare workers more time to treat patients.
March 9, 2020
News
Engineers have created a tabletop device that combines a robot, artificial intelligence and near-infrared and ultrasound imaging to draw blood or insert catheters to deliver fluids and drugs. Their research results suggest that autonomous systems like the image-guided robotic device could outperform people on some complex medical tasks.
December 3, 2020
News
A million Americans with injury or age-related disabilities need someone to help them eat. Now engineers have taught a robot to pick up food with a fork and gingerly deliver it to a person’s mouth.
December 9, 2020
News
Researchers funded by NIBIB have designed neuron-like probes that can be implanted and remain viable for long-term use to study and treat the brain.
September 3, 2019
News
NIBIB-funded engineers are designing aortic heart valve replacements made of polymers rather than animal heart tissues. The goal is to optimize valve performance and enable increased use of a minimally-invasive method for valve replacement over open heart surgery.
December 3, 2020
News
Nanogenerator’s electrical pulses provide beneficial outcomes with no side effects – rat study.
December 9, 2020
News
Pharmaceuticals can target specific molecules involved in disease processes, but get distributed throughout the body where they can cause unwanted side effects. An approach known as electroceuticals aims to avoid systemic exposure by using small wires to electrically monitor individual nerves that control organ function and carry information about disease. The promise of electroceuticals has been challenging due to the lack of biocompatible wires. Now, NIBIB-funded researches have spun carbon nanotubes into flexible, nerve-sized yarns capable of long-term connections in live animals. The development of these biocompatible yarns opens the possibility of new bioelectric diagnostics and therapies through regulation of organ function at the single nerve level.
October 3, 2019
News
Florida International University announced that the FDA has approved further trials of the university’s prosthetic hand system. The prosthetic is “similar to a pacemaker” in that it “works by delivering electrical pulses to specific nerves in the arm, using a wireless device that can be surgically implanted within the nerves. Sensors embedded in the prosthetic send signals to the implanted device, which then elicits sensations by delivering pulses.” Grace Peng, program director at National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, which has collaborated on development of the prosthetic, said, “This unique system, integrating the long-term efforts of academia and industry, is an example of the bioengineering partnerships we promote.” Read the full article in the South Florida Business Journal. Read the full article in the South Florida Business Journal.