Explore more about: Microfluidic Bioanalytical Systems

October 13, 2020
News
In a groundbreaking new study, researchers have 3D printed unique fluid channels at the micron scale that could automate production of diagnostics, sensors, and assays used for a variety of medical tests and other applications.
August 26, 2020
News
The winners of National Institutes of Health’s 9th annual Design by Biomedical Undergraduate Teams (DEBUT) challenge developed simple and low-cost diagnostics and treatments for conditions such as tuberculosis, cervical cancer, birth defects, and onchocerciasis (river blindness).
December 3, 2020
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Scientists have taken a common, yet laborious lab test and redesigned it to be performed in small 3D printed pipette tips used to measure and transfer fluids in the laboratory.
December 3, 2020
News
NIBIB-funded researchers used photoacoustic imaging for rapid measurement of metabolic rate of individual cells from breast tumors—information that can help guide treatment strategies.
December 9, 2020
News
Precision cancer treatment relies on obtaining molecular information about the tumor to guide effective treatment decisions. Bioengineers have developed micro-technologies that capture extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by brain tumors. The vesicles carry samples of the mutated genetic material and proteins causing malignancy that researchers can analyze to optimize treatment.
December 9, 2020
News
NIH-funded biomedical engineers have developed a rapid test using a single drop of blood for early detection of the deadly blood infection, sepsis. The microfluidic chip could enable early intervention for this life-threatening complication, which accounts for the most deaths and highest medical expenses in hospitals worldwide.
December 9, 2020
News

A new portable device can quickly find markers of deadly, unpredictable sepsis infection from a single drop of blood. The device is the first to provide rapid, point-of-care measurement of the immune system's response, without any need to process the blood. This can help doctors identify sepsis at its onset, monitor infected patients and could even point to a prognosis. Read more at Illinois News Bureau.

December 9, 2020
News
Preterm birth is the leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Among the many underlying causes of pregnancy-associated complications, it is known that infection and inflammation are highly significant risk factors. Now, NIBIB-funded researchers have developed a system to capture and identify a scarce blood peptide (a fragment of an inflammatory protein) called P1 that can predict increased risk of preterm birth. Early detection offers the opportunity to begin medical interventions to delay birth or increase fetus viability to save lives and reduce lifelong disabilities.