Explore more about: Microscopy

March 11, 2021
News
Sometimes scientists discover exciting results after spending years searching for an answer to a single question. But sometimes discoveries are made by surprising collaborations and connections—resulting in answers to questions no one would have thought ask.
July 10, 2020
News
Scientists at NIBIB have developed new image processing techniques for microscopes that can reduce post-processing time up to several thousand-fold.
April 14, 2020
News
Bioengineers have combined standard microscopy, infrared light, and artificial intelligence to assemble digital biopsies that identify important molecular characteristics of cancer biopsy samples.
November 25, 2019
News
Women undergoing treatment for ovarian cancer are checked for tumor cells that may have spread to surrounding tissues, but current technologies miss very small metastatic areas. Now a laser microscopy technique is able to identify these regions with great accuracy.
August 19, 2019
News
Using a mouse model of stuttering, scientists report that a loss of cells called astrocytes in the brain is associated with stuttering.
August 22, 2019
News
A new spectroscopic technique reveals that glucose use in live cells provides valuable information about the functional status of cells, tissues, and organs. Shifts in a cell’s use of glucose can signal changes in health and progress of disease.
September 10, 2019
News
Photoacoustic microscopy technique allows researchers to analyze metabolic characteristics of cancer cells with laser light and high-frequency ultrasonic sensing.
September 11, 2019
News
Researchers have invented a new way to fabricate nanoscale 3D objects of nearly any shape. They can also pattern the objects with a variety of useful materials, including metals, semiconducting quantum dots, and DNA.
December 9, 2020
News
A team of NIH-funded researchers at the University of Arkansas have demonstrated the novel use of multiphoton microscopy to monitor wound healing in live animals.
December 9, 2020
News
Up to 50% of women skip potentially life-saving mammograms often because the procedure can cause extreme discomfort and pain. Now researchers have developed a painless, light-based, non-radioactive, 15-second procedure that could revolutionize breast cancer screening and save lives.