Explore more about: Microscopy

September 6, 2019
News
Scientists at the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) have combined two different microscope technologies to create sharper images of rapidly moving processes inside a cell.
December 3, 2020
News
Cancer fighting nanovaccines have shown significant promise, but clinical application has been hampered by complications in large-scale manufacturing, quality control, and safety. Biomedical engineers at the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) developed a new technology that enables nanovaccines to bind to the albumin protein naturally present in the body. The albumin protein then delivers these nanocomplexes to the lymph nodes, resulting in potent immune activation against multiple tumor types in mouse cancer models. The use of natural albumin as a universal vaccine shuttle is a significant step towards the application of cancer nanovaccine immunotherapy in humans.
March 5, 2020
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Hari Shroff, Ph.D., chief of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering’s lab section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI), and his team have spent the last few years developing optical microscopes that produce high resolution images at very high speed. After his lab develops these new microscopes, they release the plans and software for free, so any researcher can replicate the advances made at NIH. This latest microscope builds on previous improvements that Shroff’s lab had made with selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM).
December 3, 2020
News
Researchers funded by NIH have developed an imaging method that reveals a much more diverse and flexible DNA-protein chromatin chain than previously thought. The result suggests a nimbler structure to regulate gene expression, and provide a mechanism for chemical modifications of DNA to be maintained as cells divide.
December 3, 2020
News
A new microscope merges different microscopy methods to increase resolution and contrast in thick biological samples. A key component of the method is two-photon microscopy, used to generate a small point of light deep inside the sample. By moving this light throughout the sample and collecting information on how it is being distorted, Shroff and his team are able to adjust the shape of the mirror to cancel out the distortions, thus creating a clear image of the whole sample.
December 3, 2020
News
Fluorescent quantum dots are valuable tools used to tag and image biological processes in live animals. However, precise fluorescent imaging at the cellular and molecular levels has not been possible because of non-specific fluorescence and light scattering by surrounding tissues. Now researchers have resolved many of these problems by using SWIR quantum dots in live mice to image working organs, take metabolic measurements, and track microvascular blood flow in normal brain and brain tumors.
October 18, 2019
News

A significant step has been made toward breaking the so-called 'color barrier' of light microscopy for biological systems, allowing for much more comprehensive, system-wide labeling and imaging of a greater number of biomolecules in living cells and tissues than is currently attainable. The advancement has the potential for many future applications, including helping to guide the development of therapies to treat and cure disease. Read more at ScienceDaily.

December 3, 2020
News
Researchers funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering have developed a non-invasive imaging technique that accurately detects skin cancer without surgical biopsy. Multiphoton microscopy of mitochondria—small organelles that produce energy in cells—accurately identified melanomas and basal cell carcinomas by detecting abnormal clusters of mitochondria in both types of skin cancer.
December 7, 2020
News
Brain surgery for removing cancerous tissue is a delicate and high-stakes task. Now researchers funded by NIBIB have created a way to improve tumor removal surgery by distinguishing cancerous tissue from healthy tissue faster. The method developed by researchers at the University of Michigan Medical School makes brain tumor surgery more precise, improving safety.
December 3, 2020
News
A team of scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health has developed a new tool to monitor under a microscope how cells attach to one another. Studying adhesion events can help researchers understand how tissues grow, how diseases spread, and how stem cells differentiate into more specific cell types.