Explore more about: Ultrasound (US) diagnostic

December 3, 2020
News
Using an approach that combines ultrasound imaging and genetic engineering of bacterial microbes, a team from California Institute of Technology (Caltech), with funding from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), has created a powerful new system to track bacteria dispatched to deliver therapies deep inside the body.
December 9, 2020
News
Researchers have developed a photoacoustic imaging technique that uses lasers to create detailed ultrasound images in live animals. The method allows for complete internal body scans with enough spatiotemporal resolution to see active organs, circulating cancer cells, and brain function.
December 9, 2020
News
A team of bioengineers supported through a Small Business Innovation Research grant from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) has developed a pocket-sized, ultrasound imaging device to aid doctors in accurately placing needles into the lumbar, or lower, spine.
December 9, 2020
News

Researchers have developed a new surgical tool that uses low-frequency intravascular ultrasound to break down blood clots that cause deep vein thrombosis. The tool is the first ultrasound 'drill' that can be aimed straight ahead, allowing doctors to better target clots -- which holds promise for significantly reducing treatment time. To date, the technology has been tested only in synthetic blood vessels. Read more at NC State News.

December 9, 2020
News

NIBIB grantee Kullervo Hynynen has won the Focused Ultrasound Foundation's 2016 Visionary Award. Hynynen has been instrumental in the development of the first clinical system for MR-guided focused ultrasound. Read more at http://www.fusfoundation.org

October 2, 2019
News
Scientists say that protein engineering techniques might one day lead to colorful ultrasound images of cells deep within our bodies.
December 3, 2020
News
NIH-funded team has created a new simulator that allows clinicians to gain practice on a mannequin before trying it on patients for complicated ultrasounds.
December 9, 2020
News
NIBIB-funded researchers used ultrasound-activated microbubbles to improve preservation of heart muscle and function in a pig heart attack model. Based on this success, the method is now in phase I human clinical trials. In the animal model, the treatment both with and without a low dose of the clot-busting drug tPA improved heart function and reduced the size of infarct (damaged area of heart muscle). Potentially, the promising treatment could be rapidly administered to heart attack patients arriving at the emergency room (or even while in the ambulance), and could preserve heart muscle before patients receive invasive interventions to open blocked arteries. The clinical trial will help to determine if the early microbubble intervention results in overall better outcomes for patients.