Creating Biomedical Technologies to Improve Health

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Science Highlights • August 29, 2017
Researchers have developed a photoacoustic imaging technique that uses lasers to create detailed ultrasound images in live animals. The method allows for complete internal body scans with enough spatiotemporal resolution to see active organs, circulating cancer cells, and brain function.
Press Releases • August 25, 2017
Tools to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease and latent tuberculosis are among the winning projects in the Design by Biomedical Undergraduate Teams (DEBUT) challenge, a biomedical engineering design prize competition for teams of undergraduate students. The teams developed prototypes of devices that advance technology and improve human health. The DEBUT challenge, with prizes worth $65,000, is supported by a public-private partnership between the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), part of the National Institutes of Health, and VentureWell, a non-profit higher-education network that cultivates revolutionary ideas and promising inventions.
Science Highlights • August 18, 2017
A team funded in part by the NIBIB and led by University of Minnesota (UMN) researchers has developed a new method for thawing frozen tissue that may enable long-term storage and subsequent viability of tissues and organs for transplantation. The method, called nanowarming, prevents tissue damage during the rapid thawing process that would precede a transplant.
Grantee News • August 17, 2017

Researchers have developed a method that could make magnetic resonance imaging -- MRI -- multicolor. Current MRI techniques rely on a single contrast agent injected into a patient's veins to vivify images. The new method uses two at once, which could allow doctors to map multiple characteristics of a patient's internal organs in a single MRI. The strategy could serve as a research tool and even aid disease diagnosis. Watch the video here.

Science Highlights • August 10, 2017
Scientists have observed that more aerobically fit individuals have better memories. To investigate this phenomenon, they used magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), which measures the firmness and elasticity of organs, and found that fit individuals had a firmer, more elastic hippocampus—a region of the brain associated with memory. The method could provide early diagnosis and potential interventions in the initial stages of neurodegenerative disease.
Press Releases • July 27, 2017
Researchers funded by NIH have developed an imaging method that reveals a much more diverse and flexible DNA-protein chromatin chain than previously thought. The result suggests a nimbler structure to regulate gene expression, and provide a mechanism for chemical modifications of DNA to be maintained as cells divide.
Press Releases • July 27, 2017
NIH-funded scientists at the University of Florida have discovered a new method of observing the brain changes caused by Parkinson’s disease, which destroys neurons important for movement. The development suggests that fluid changes in a specific brain area could provide a way to track that damage.
Science Highlights • July 27, 2017
A team of bioengineers supported through a Small Business Innovation Research grant from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) has developed a pocket-sized, ultrasound imaging device to aid doctors in accurately placing needles into the lumbar, or lower, spine.
Science Highlights • July 25, 2017
NIBIB-funded researchers have developed a revolutionary 3-D printer that paves the way for direct printing of biomedical devices onto human skin. The printer builds flexible electronic sensors that measure pressure.  They’re expected to improve sensation in prosthetic hands and surgical robotic arms.
Science Highlights • July 20, 2017
“Seeing is believing,” has been taken to heart by researchers as they strive to develop microscopes that will reveal biological structures and processes with increased clarity and detail. Now, researchers funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering have developed a technique that uses the vibration of chemical bonds to produce specific colors that allow them to simultaneously observe, in cells and tissues, as many as 24 interacting molecules--each with a distinct color.

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