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Biomaterials and Biomolecular Constructs

This program supports the development of biomaterials and biomolecular constructs to elicit a broadly applied biomedically relevant effect across a spectrum of diagnostic, therapeutic, imaging, and interventional applications.

Emphasis

Emphasis is on engineering functionality and issues surrounding biocompatibility of biomaterials and biomolecular constructs. Function could be derived from the static or dynamic properties of materials and based on biochemical, electromagnetic, mechanical, and/or tribological properties, for example.

Additional emphasis

The biomaterials and biomolecular constructs may be engineered to further enable technologies that are relevant to other NIBIB-supported program areas including but not limited to:

The biomaterials and biomolecular constructs may be components of control systems, such as:

  • delivery vehicles (liposomes, DNA nanoparticles, virus-like particles, metallic nanoparticles, micelles, dendrimers, etc.) for the targeted control of active agents
  • surface-modified substrates for microfluidic platforms
  • toehold switches for synthetic genetic circuits
  • nucleases for genome editing machinery

Furthermore, this program supports the development of control systems (e.g., genome editing machinery, synthetic genetic circuits, microfluidics, etc.) designed to engineer biomaterials and biomolecular constructs.

Lastly, this program supports the development of analytical tools to interrogate biomaterials and biomolecular constructs as related to their design, development, and initial validation.

Notes

The development of imaging probes is supported by the NIBIB Molecular Probes and Imaging Agents program.

 
Grant Number Project Title Principal Investigator Institution
1-DP2-EB024377-01 A New Paradigm in Nanomedicine: can structural interiors of nanoparticles regulate cellular delivery? Cecilia Leal University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
5-R01-EB018358-04 Shape Control and Transport Properties of DNA-Copolymer Micelles Hai-Quan Mao Johns Hopkins University
5-R01-EB019963-04 Direct Deposition of Polymer Fibers for Use as a Surgical Sealant Peter Kofinas Univ of Maryland, College Park
1-R15-EB022345-01A1 Neutrophil Response to Tissue Templates in Vitro: Implant Implications Gary Bowlin University of Memphis
1-R15-EB021581-01A1 Mechanisms of Intracellular trafficking and endosomal escape of nanoparticles for mRNA delivery Gaurav Sahay Oregon State University
1-R15-EB024921-01 Mechanism of Candida albicans rupture on biomimetic NSS Dennis La Jeunesse University of North Carolina Greensboro
5-R21-EB023369-02 Immunomodulation through Nanocapsule-Mediated Cytosolic Delivery of siRNA Vincent Rotello University of Massachusetts Amherst
5-R21-EB024083-02 Enhancing cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses by directly loading CTL epitope vaccines onto MHC Class I complexes on the dendritic cell surface Mingnan Chen University of Utah
5-R01-EB021308-04 Dissolvable Hydrogel Dressing for the Treatment of Burns Mark Grinstaff Boston University (Charles River Campus)
5-R01-EB026896-02 Harnessing biomaterials to study the link between local lymph node function and systemic tolerance Christopher Jewell Univ of Maryland, College Park