More by Raymond MacDougall

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The federal government has expanded the Home Test to Treat program, an entirely virtual community health program that offers free COVID-19 health services.
NIH Blueprint MedTech program has issued nine awards in its first competition cycle. The program seeks to accelerate transformative medical devices to treat disorders of the nervous system.
NIH will advance the development of home-based and point-of-care health technologies with awards to six technology research and development centers around the country. The centers comprise the Point of Care Technology Research Network (POCTRN) and will parlay the momentum of the original network established in 2007 by the NIBIB.
The Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics Technology (RADx® Tech) Fetal Monitoring Challenge calls on scientists, engineers, and clinicians around the country to submit their innovative approaches and compete for prizes and additional resources to support technology development and clinical impact.
New recommendations from the NIH Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics (RADx®) Tech Program provide a blueprint for the design and manufacture of more accessible diagnostic tests.
NIBIB has established the Center for Biomedical Engineering Technology Acceleration—BETA Center, a new intramural research program to solve a range of medicine’s most pressing problems. The BETA Center will serve the wider NIH intramural research program as a biotechnology resource and catalyst for NIH research discoveries.
NIH has launched the Home Test to Treat program, an entirely virtual community health intervention that will provide free COVID-19 health services—at-home rapid tests, telehealth sessions and at-home treatments—in selected communities.
Reporting a positive or negative test result just became easier through a new website from the National Institutes of Health. MakeMyTestCount.org, developed through NIH’s Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics (RADx®) Tech program, allows users to anonymously report the results of any brand of at-home COVID-19 test.
The National Institutes of Health has awarded research funding for seven pilot projects developing early stage, yet groundbreaking neuro-technologies. The innovative projects would enable new medical devices to diagnose and treat both acute and chronic disorders, from neuropathic pain to mental illness.
When it blasts off from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Artemis I will carry two anthropomorphic mannequins strapped into its crew module. The mannequins are part of a project aided by a team of Duke University bioengineers with support from NIBIB.
NIBIB Director Bruce J. Tromberg, Ph.D., has been elected to membership in the National Academy of Medicine.
The National Institutes of Health, through its Blueprint MedTech program, has established two incubator hubs and launched a funding solicitation in support of commercially viable, clinically focused neurotechnology solutions to diagnose and treat disorders of the nervous system.
A research team funded by the National Institutes of Health has shown that commercially available rapid antigen tests can detect past and present variants of concern and has identified potential mutations that may impact test performance in the future.
A new study that could have immediate implications for COVID-19 testing in schools found that with age-appropriate instructions, school-aged children can successfully use a nasal swab to obtain their own COVID-19 test specimen.
NIH today announced the winners of its NIH Technology Accelerator Challenge (NTAC) for Maternal Health, a prize competition for developers of diagnostic technologies to help improve maternal health around the world.