More by Raymond MacDougall

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NIH, working in collaboration with the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), today announced a third round of contract awards for scale-up and manufacturing of new COVID-19 testing technologies.
NIH has awarded seven contracts to companies and academic institutions to develop digital health solutions that help address the COVID-19 pandemic.
NIH announced $129.3 million in scale-up and manufacturing support for a new set of COVID-19 testing technologies as part of RADx. These tests add to initial awards made to seven companies on July 31, 2020.
NIH is investing $248.7 million in new technologies to address challenges associated with COVID-19 testing (which detects SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus). NIH’s RADx initiative has awarded contracts to seven biomedical diagnostic companies to support a range of new lab-based and point-of-care tests.
In a paper in the New England Journal of Medicine, scientific leaders from the National Institutes of Health set forth a framework to increase significantly the number, quality and type of daily tests for detecting SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and help reduce inequities for underserved populations that have been disproportionally affected by the disease.
The Tissue Chips in Space initiative is an ambitious collaborative endeavor that brings NIBIB, NCATS, and the ISS U.S. National Laboratory together to rapidly advance tissue chip technology for biomedical research.
NIH has announced a new initiative aimed at speeding innovation, development and commercialization of COVID-19 testing technologies, a pivotal component needed to return to normal during this unprecedented global pandemic.
A team at ClearCam, Inc., with funding from the NIBIB and ties to the University of Texas at Austin, designed a device for wiping a laparoscope lens clean, much the same way that a wiper blade clears a fogged up window.
Medical physicists at the Mayo Clinic have just made a unique library of computed tomography (CT) data publicly available so that imaging researchers can study, develop, validate, and optimize algorithms and enhance imaging hardware to produce peak-quality CT images using low radiation doses.
Researchers at the University of Memphis-based Center of Excellence for Mobile Sensor Data-to-Knowledge (MD2K) have introduced a new mobile app that may support physical distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic. MD2K is supported by NIH with a grant administered by the NIBIB.
A new study has begun recruiting at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, to determine how many adults in the United States without a confirmed history of infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), have antibodies to the virus.
Grace C.Y. Peng, Ph.D., Director of the NIBIB Program in Mathematical Modeling, Simulation and Analysis, has been elected to the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE College of Fellows).
With his election this past February to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), NIH’s Peter Basser achieved one of the highest professional distinctions accorded to any engineer.
The National Institutes of Health has launched a $1 million Technology Accelerator Challenge (TAC) to spur the design and development of non-invasive, handheld, digital technologies to detect, diagnose, and guide therapies for diseases with high global and public health impact.
Doctors need better ways to detect and monitor heart disease, the leading cause of death in industrialized countries. Researchers with support from NIBIB has developed an improved optical imaging technique that found differences between potentially life-threatening coronary plaques and those posing less imminent danger for patients with coronary artery disease.