Explore more about: Image processing

July 13, 2021
News
– The National Institutes of Health are helping to fund an evolution in medical imaging, and a University at Buffalo-led research team is leading the way. Jun Xia, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, received a $1.6 million grant to improve medical imaging for people with chronic leg ulcers. The project is a collaboration with the surgery clinic of UBMD Physician’s Group and other UB researchers.
June 2, 2021
News
A team of NIH microscopists and computer scientists used a type of artificial intelligence called a neural network to obtain clearer pictures of cells at work even with extremely low, cell-friendly light levels.
November 24, 2020
News
A team of engineers has demonstrated how a new algorithm they developed was able to successfully predict whether or not a COVID-19 patient would need ICU intervention. This artificial intelligence-based approach could be a valuable tool in determining a proper course of treatment for individual patients.
August 22, 2020
News
NIBIB-funded researchers at NYU Langone Health worked with Facebook AI researchers to develop a method to speed up MRI scans.
August 22, 2020
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NIBIB-funded researchers have developed a way to use artificial intelligence to speed up MRI imaging without sacrificing quality.
December 13, 2019
News
QuantX backstops radiologists with AI-enabled software that analyzes MRIs to confirm or challenge their diagnosis.
March 15, 2021
News
A new deep learning technique constructs better macroscopic medical images of cells and tissues at ultra-fast speeds.
December 3, 2020
News
Tuberculosis meningitis causes life-threatening inflammation of the membranes in the brain and spinal cord.
December 3, 2020
News
Researchers funded by NIH have developed an imaging method that reveals a much more diverse and flexible DNA-protein chromatin chain than previously thought. The result suggests a nimbler structure to regulate gene expression, and provide a mechanism for chemical modifications of DNA to be maintained as cells divide.
September 3, 2019
News
Scientists funded by NIH have developed a new way to identify the state and fate of individual stem cells earlier than previously possible. Stem cells are undifferentiated, serving as building blocks for the various tissues and organs of the body. Understanding a stem cell’s fate—the type of cell it will eventually become—and how far along it is in that process can help scientists better manipulate cells for therapies.