Explore more about: Bio-Electromagnetic Technologies

August 3, 2020
News
Understanding the source and network of signals as the brain functions is a central goal of brain research. Now, Carnegie Mellon engineers have created a system for high-density EEG imaging of the origin and path of normal and abnormal brain signals.
October 7, 2020
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Marking a major milestone on the path to meeting the objectives of the NIH BRAIN initiative, researchers advance high-density electroencephalography (EEG) as the future paradigm for dynamic functional neuroimaging.
December 9, 2020
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Bioengineers have developed a 3D printing technique that creates the interacting networks for transport of air, blood, and other bodily fluids—a major step toward 3D printed replacement organs.
August 16, 2019
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A new, low-cost wound dressing could dramatically speed up healing by using a patient's body motions to apply gentle electrical pulses at the site of an injury
December 3, 2020
News
Pulmonary fibrosis is one of the most common and serious types of lung disease. Now NIBIB-funded researchers have developed an in vitro lung tissue-on-a-chip system that mimics lung fibrosis, offering rapid testing of potential new anti-fibrotic treatments.
December 3, 2020
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NIBIB-funded researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have created an ingestible sensor to non-invasively monitor indicators of disease in the stomach and intestines.
December 9, 2020
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While several products are available to quickly seal surface wounds, rapidly stopping fatal internal bleeding has proven more difficult. Now researchers from the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Texas A&M University are developing an injectable hydrogel bandage that could save lives in emergencies such as penetrating shrapnel wounds on the battlefield.
December 9, 2020
News
Researchers are now able to use induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) to form a model of human adult-like cardiac muscle by introducing electric and mechanical stimulation at an early stage. Since this muscle is similar to the adult heart, it could serve as a better model for testing the effects of drugs and toxic substances than current tissue-engineered heart models.
December 9, 2020
News
More than 50 million Americans have food allergies and often just trace amounts of allergens can trigger life-threatening reactions. Now, NIBIB-funded researchers at Harvard Medical School have developed a $40 device that fits on a key chain and can accurately test for allergens, like gluten or nuts, in a restaurant meal in less than 10 minutes.
December 9, 2020
News
Engineers funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) have developed glasses with liquid-based lenses that “flex” to refocus on whatever the wearer is viewing.